Images of French Grand Army Veterans

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Images of French Grand Army Veterans

Post by conjurer » November 7th 2019, 9:11pm

From the Napoleonic wars:

https://mashable.com/2014/10/27/napoleo ... -veterans/

Naturally, there were no cameras back then; these are very aged veterans who would get into their old uniforms (which were obviously altered) for different events. A Parisian photographer had a few of these old-timers pose for him; and while it's slightly comical to see these old duffers in their splendid uniforms, let's not forget that, in their day, they were some bad-ass motherfuckers.

This guy was probably at Waterloo:

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Happy Veteran's day!
My little brain can't even comprehend how deep that is.

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Re: Images of French Grand Army Veterans

Post by bbattle » November 9th 2019, 4:20pm

There is video of a 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. The by now very old soldiers assembled on the field, then charged each other. When they met each other, they hugged one another.

I found some still photos but I have seen the video before; probably on Ken Burns' documentary.

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Re: Images of French Grand Army Veterans

Post by koimaster » November 10th 2019, 10:20pm

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Re: Images of French Grand Army Veterans

Post by conjurer » November 11th 2019, 12:00am

bbattle wrote:
November 9th 2019, 4:20pm
There is video of a 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. The by now very old soldiers assembled on the field, then charged each other. When they met each other, they hugged one another.

I found some still photos but I have seen the video before; probably on Ken Burns' documentary.

It is said that generals always fight the last war; this is certainly true during the American Civil War. Generals of both sides copied the tactics of Napoleon; alas, weapons (or, as they are termed today, "force multipliers") had advanced to a great extent. At Waterloo, there was precisely one regiment armed with rifled muskets--all the rest used smoothbore muskets, which were worthless past a few dozen yards. During the Civil War, just about every soldier was issued a rifled musket, which would shoot true to two hundred yards, or about the same as most infantry rifles today fired without optical sights. So, a well-trained rifleman could hit a man-sized, moving target, with iron sights, up to two football fields away--and this included pretty much every southerner, who probably could kill a squirrel with a rifle from the age of five.

Add into this the introduction of conical bullets, exploding artillery shells, repeating arms, and even the earliest machine guns, the idea of long lines of soldiers advancing across a battlefield, like they did thirty years ago at Waterloo, spelling the massacre of many thousands of young men. Add in many more thousands of young men who died from disease from insanitary camps, and you end up with a lost generation, fifty years before the next lost generation, those who died in Flanders, Ypres and Gallipoli.

Today, with modern medicine, advanced airpower and body armor, more and more standard infantrymen survive the horrors and damage of war. They come home missing limbs, or with terrific mental damage, but they live on. Not so long ago, they would have died in fields of grain or forests, from the Vietnamese Highlands to the steppes of Russia. And they would have died in great pain, all of them crying out for their mothers, in every language there ever was.

All of these young men died in honor; their honor is their own, not to be shared with the politicians who sent them to battle, or the generals who ordered them on impossible missions. Often their lives were given for the wrong choice, be them the Kentuckian who died for the Confederacy at Antietam or the boy from Bremen in the Wehrmacht who perished in Łódź. Young privates in any army do not make policy, it is the politicians who make policy. It is the young men who go forward to take the hill, to grenade the machine gun nest, to ignite the other young men with flame throwers who die because of policy. It is the young men who die very young, who have never married, or been laid, or have even kissed a girl. They die with honor, because they don't issue the orders. They just carry the orders out, or die trying to do so.

So, to all those young men who signed the blank check, thank you. Thanks to all veterans. And have a fine and, most importantly, a peaceful Veteran's day.
My little brain can't even comprehend how deep that is.

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Re: Images of French Grand Army Veterans

Post by 3Flushes » November 11th 2019, 12:39am

conjurer wrote:
November 11th 2019, 12:00am
...
It is said that generals always fight the last war; this is certainly true during the American Civil War. Generals of both sides copied the tactics of Napoleon; alas, weapons (or, as they are termed today, "force multipliers") had advanced to a great extent. At Waterloo, there was precisely one regiment armed with rifled muskets--all the rest used smoothbore muskets, which were worthless past a few dozen yards. During the Civil War, just about every soldier was issued a rifled musket, which would shoot true to two hundred yards, or about the same as most infantry rifles today fired without optical sights. So, a well-trained rifleman could hit a man-sized, moving target, with iron sights, up to two football fields away--and this included pretty much every southerner, who probably could kill a squirrel with a rifle from the age of five.

Add into this the introduction of conical bullets, exploding artillery shells, repeating arms, and even the earliest machine guns, the idea of long lines of soldiers advancing across a battlefield, like they did thirty years ago at Waterloo, spelling the massacre of many thousands of young men. Add in many more thousands of young men who died from disease from insanitary camps, and you end up with a lost generation, fifty years before the next lost generation, those who died in Flanders, Ypres and Gallipoli.

Today, with modern medicine, advanced airpower and body armor, more and more standard infantrymen survive the horrors and damage of war. They come home missing limbs, or with terrific mental damage, but they live on. Not so long ago, they would have died in fields of grain or forests, from the Vietnamese Highlands to the steppes of Russia. And they would have died in great pain, all of them crying out for their mothers, in every language there ever was.

All of these young men died in honor; their honor is their own, not to be shared with the politicians who sent them to battle, or the generals who ordered them on impossible missions. Often their lives were given for the wrong choice, be them the Kentuckian who died for the Confederacy at Antietam or the boy from Bremen in the Wehrmacht who perished in Łódź. Young privates in any army do not make policy, it is the politicians who make policy. It is the young men who go forward to take the hill, to grenade the machine gun nest, to ignite the other young men with flame throwers who die because of policy. It is the young men who die very young, who have never married, or been laid, or have even kissed a girl. They die with honor, because they don't issue the orders. They just carry the orders out, or die trying to do so.

So, to all those young men who signed the blank check, thank you. Thanks to all veterans. And have a fine and, most importantly, a peaceful Veteran's day.
Wow, John-

Happy Veterans Day to all yous Lords and everyone who put on the uniform.
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The past is never dead. It isn't even past.- Faulkner
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Re: Images of French Grand Army Veterans

Post by koimaster » November 11th 2019, 10:04am

vietnam_womens_memorial-e1415725577611.jpg
Vietnam Women’s Memorial: Honoring The 265,000 Forgotten Women Who Served

https://womenyoushouldknow.net/vietnam- ... en-served/

https://connectingvets.radio.com/articl ... -advocates

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1946-2006

“Your heart was warm and happy

With the lilt of Irish laughter

Every day and in every way

Now forever and ever after."
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