The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

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DBCooper
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by DBCooper » May 12th 2012, 4:01pm

Very interesting subject. When there are no events to measure will time cease to exist? Very interesting indeed. Welcome to the forum ET.
After all, no ham-wristed louts complained when all watches were 34mm - no cries of "looks like a little girl's watch on my wrist!" Like King Canute on the beach, that's where I draw the line - come what may.

Falstaff, May 19, 2014.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by Guest » May 12th 2012, 4:02pm

EntropicTimer wrote:
DBCooper wrote:If there nothing is left to change does space-time exist?


I could be wrong but I think that is unknowable given the current state of physics. Physics remains full of mysteries that are even now giving themselves up to humanity through science and mathematics.




That's kind-of-a cop out. To approach this seriously one would have to first examine the notion of nothing. Virtual particles deeply complicate this seemingly simple notion. See Dirac et al. But I'm a tired old man and am going to toddle off and finish getting plastered.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by DBCooper » May 12th 2012, 4:28pm

Bigjimzlll wrote:I think that the only true constant is there is always change. With change there will be events to measure.


According to theoretical physicists at some point in the very distant future (<--ha there's a time reference right there) there will be no more change. The degradation of all the matter and energy in the universe will reach the ultimate state of inert uniformity. You can thank ET's username for opening this can of worms.

Image
After all, no ham-wristed louts complained when all watches were 34mm - no cries of "looks like a little girl's watch on my wrist!" Like King Canute on the beach, that's where I draw the line - come what may.

Falstaff, May 19, 2014.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by Bigjimzlll » May 12th 2012, 5:05pm

Theoretical physicists are a catty lot(imo). Too much ego. Don't get me started on cosmologists.
I love the theories...all of them. It boggles the mind.
There are times when I am in deep relaxation when I feel I'm about to be struck withTHE answer.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by Guest » May 13th 2012, 2:06am

DBCooper wrote:
Bigjimzlll wrote:I think that the only true constant is there is always change. With change there will be events to measure.


According to theoretical physicists at some point in the very distant future (<--ha there's a time reference right there) there will be no more change. The degradation of all the matter and energy in the universe will reach the ultimate state of inert uniformity. You can thank ET's username for opening this can of worms.


I feel that assertion needs qualification. It is at variance with the standard model. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_decay and http://hep.bu.edu/~superk/pdk.html for starters. As noted there are several hypothesis whose models include proton decay but theoretically the proton remains immortal. Of course if the LHC doesn't find the Higgs Boson the standard model fails. But that does not necessarily imply that a superseding theory will entail proton decay.

And virtual particles remain in any case.

But I don't have a horse in this race, just trying to keep track of what is actually known and what is not is exhausting enough.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by DBCooper » May 13th 2012, 3:16am

I need you to keep this on the Are You Smarter Than A 5th Grader Level. This is only an interest of mine ET. I just read and try to comprehend. I have no schooling on the matter. Not very good with calculations or equations either. It just makes sense to me that stars don't last forever and will eventually burn out and all the heat in the universe will spread out and everything will reach the same temp. If everything reaches the same temp what will be the catalyst for change?
After all, no ham-wristed louts complained when all watches were 34mm - no cries of "looks like a little girl's watch on my wrist!" Like King Canute on the beach, that's where I draw the line - come what may.

Falstaff, May 19, 2014.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by Guest » May 13th 2012, 4:34am

Because the stars are in motion relative to one another. It follows directly from Newton's First Law of Motion that the stars will continue to move for ever and ever even after all the stars burnout. So thier positions will continue to change for ever and ever.

As will the positions of the eternal protons.

As to temperature:

The temperature of a substance typically varies with the average speed of the particles that it contains, raised to the second power; that is, it is proportional to the mean kinetic energy of its constituent particles. Formally, temperature is defined as the derivative of the internal energy with respect to the entropy.


Even if all particles are at the same temperature and so are moving at the same speed their directions differ and so relative positions change.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by DBCooper » May 13th 2012, 4:56am

Does a white dwarf explode when reaching its mass limit leaving nothing? When a neutron star reaches its limit does it leave behind a black hole? Don't black holes eventually dissappear? Is anything infinite?
After all, no ham-wristed louts complained when all watches were 34mm - no cries of "looks like a little girl's watch on my wrist!" Like King Canute on the beach, that's where I draw the line - come what may.

Falstaff, May 19, 2014.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by DBCooper » May 13th 2012, 5:33am

Are you saying the existance (life expectancy?) of the proton is infinite or there has been no decay observed? Subatomic particles just don't interest me but I suppose in this context they are unavoidable.Image
After all, no ham-wristed louts complained when all watches were 34mm - no cries of "looks like a little girl's watch on my wrist!" Like King Canute on the beach, that's where I draw the line - come what may.

Falstaff, May 19, 2014.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by Guest » May 13th 2012, 6:03am

DBCooper wrote:Are you saying the existance (life expectancy?) of the proton is infinite or there has been no decay observed? ...


Both. But I feel I can do no more than point you back to these references already given:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_decay http://hep.bu.edu/~superk/pdk.html

And from which:

In the Standard Model, protons, a type of baryon, are theoretically stable because baryon number (quark number) is conserved (under normal circumstances; however, see chiral anomaly). Therefore, protons will not decay into other particles on their own, because they are the lightest (and therefore least energetic) baryon.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by DBCooper » May 13th 2012, 6:12am

Image

Ahh...the paradox of existence. It has gotten too deep and I am drowning. Time for me to stand up, hook up and shuffle to the door. Carry on.
After all, no ham-wristed louts complained when all watches were 34mm - no cries of "looks like a little girl's watch on my wrist!" Like King Canute on the beach, that's where I draw the line - come what may.

Falstaff, May 19, 2014.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by Tzimisces » May 13th 2012, 6:30am

Jump right out and shout MARINE CORPS!
And if my 'chute don't open round, I'll be the first one on the ground.

There are times when I am in deep relaxation when I feel I'm about to be struck withTHE answer.

I do believe the answer is 42. The trick is finding the question.
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Re: The obligatory intro & 3 pages of prattle

Post by Falstaff » May 13th 2012, 7:47am

Existence, while endlessly mutable, is, of necessity, infinite. The difference between is and is not. World without end.

C'mon, fellows - take the big leap. No more of this mucking about with baryons and Higgs bosons ("God particle", my ass); mere waystations to the terminal point. The fundamental particle is undoubtedly the (drumroll, please, professor) the Existon - because that's what it do - exist. The most basic unit of is. All other forms of matter and energy are simply various combinations of existons - driven by a great gravity engine. Gravity (besides being the opposite of comedy) is simply an affinity of the existing for the existing. Remember that you heard it here first. Falstaff - Father of the Existon.

As Schrodinger said, "I have no doubt that I am correct."
"...and I shan't quit ripping them till I do get buckled!"

J the R 1888
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