Well shit, I bought another another Tudor

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smellody (Online)
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Well shit, I bought another another Tudor

Post by smellody » January 23rd 2023, 6:47pm

This one is vintage. 1974 actually, like me. Not a dive watch. Some will hate the integrates bracelet. Some will say "damn that's cool 😎."

I'd have you all guess, but it is so obscure you would never guess. More info when it arrives Wednesday.

I NEVER get new watches. .. but I have two incoming on Wednesday and one one Thursday.

Times are tough. . .
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3Flushes
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Re: Well shit, I bought another another Tudor

Post by 3Flushes » January 25th 2023, 7:41pm

Nice cvatch.

The patina on the white enamel dials of the era is interesting. In the enameling process, metal oxides are mixed with powdered glass which is then fired onto a metal baseplate.

IIRC my watchmaker once told me that vintage baseplates contained a fair amount of iron. The oxides used to make white enamel would interact with the iron over time producing gas from oxidation trapped by the fired material thus producing the tiny bubbles. Improvements in materials and coatings for the baseplates eliminated what was once considered a defect in the process.

Funny how times and values change.
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smellody (Online)
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Re: Well shit, I bought another another Tudor

Post by smellody » January 25th 2023, 7:54pm

3Flushes wrote:
January 25th 2023, 7:41pm
Nice cvatch.

The patina on the white enamel dials of the era is interesting. In the enameling process, metal oxides are mixed with powdered glass which is then fired onto a metal baseplate.

IIRC my watchmaker once told me that vintage baseplates contained a fair amount of iron. The oxides used to make white enamel would interact with the iron over time producing gas from oxidation trapped by the fired material thus producing the tiny bubbles. Improvements in materials and coatings for the baseplates eliminated what was once considered a defect in the process.

Funny how times and values change.
Good info!
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