SANDSTONE PICS-update, it is thin glass-put a match to it

All things related to "SWISS" Invicta watches and Chinese movements
boscoe
ASSHAT
Posts: 9794
Joined: March 31st 2010, 10:00pm
Contact:

Re: SANDSTONE PICS-update, it is thin glass-put a match to it

Post by boscoe » August 21st 2010, 6:03pm

From "BJ" bead:

Does Blue Sand Stone Jewelry Mean Color Is Blue? -----www.bjbead.com Tells You Answer

By: penny1985 Home | Arts-and-Entertainment



Unrated
Your Rating




Blue sandstone is a beautiful and attractive ore, with the glittering material in the shape of Blue sand stone is a beautiful and attractive ore, with the glittering material in the shape of spotsis a big part of the wholesale jewelry .This stone comes in dark blue which is close to purple. The sand in1447_1.jpgside occurs the blue color, for this reason, this substance is named "Blue sand stone".

Blue sand stone symbolizes the courage and perseverance. Thus, was populated in the cheap jewelry market and welcomed by a lot of people .It helps with wealth-seeking and wealth-collecting. It has hardness between 5 and 6.this can be compared with the black stone .

The brilliant stars shining in the dark blue sky bring courage, confidence and willpower and boost vitality and energy.here ,the black pearl can not be omitted ,it is regarded as the sad tears of the sky .



Wearing the blue sand stone can help people calm and relaxed. It also assists people to concentrate and become clever. It improves one's work efficiency and study ability. It symbolizes enterprise, success, victory and glory; which can enhance the power of leadership and strong and be able to enhance the body's good spirits, drive out evil spirits; clear the mind and relieve the pressure. Every piece of blue sand stone contains countless blue stars, blue and shiny.Thus .blue sand stone is active in the discount jewelry market .more and more people are engaged in the jewelry wholesale business.

Bjbead is the leading discount jewelry company in China. We can supply more than 10000 styles of discount costume jewelry, china jewelry and charm jewelry with high-quality and jewelry wholesale price.

Discount

In order to enjoy more discount, Please input your sole discount coupon (Bj6300) when place order at www.bjbead.com , Then you can enjoy the special discount policy:


Read more: http://www.articlesnatch.com/Article/Does-Blue-Sand-Stone-Jewelry-Mean-Color-Is-Blue-------www-bjbead-com-Tells-You-Answer/776179#ixzz0xIfqIv7e
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution No Derivatives
User avatar
Guest

Re: SANDSTONE PICS-update, it is thin glass-put a match to it

Post by Guest » August 21st 2010, 6:38pm

GEEKNOMO wrote:anybody can do an internet search on sandstone, blue sandstone, dark blue sandstone.................doesnt exist. not onn this planet, maybe Ilie has found an old rare deposit in his ass crack.


After not finding much on Blue Sandstone other than it is man made I looked at the other color of sandstone dial being offered as Gold Sandstone. IMO Blue and Gold sandstone are really Goldstone or aventurine glass (a lot more info when you search on goldstone). Just a sample of what I found on Wikipedia about goldstone.

GENUINE SANDSTONE MY ASS
Nomenclature

Another common name for the material is aventurine glass, based on the original Italian name avventurina (from avventura, "adventure" or "chance"). It is also sometimes called "stellaria" or "sun sitara" (sitara = "star" in Sanskrit) for its starry internal reflections, or "monk's gold" or "monkstone" from folkloric associations with an unnamed monastic order.
Curiously, aventurine glass is one of the few synthetic simulants to provide the eponym for the similar natural stones. The mineral name "aventurine" is used for forms of feldspar or quartz with mica inclusions that give a similar glittering appearance; the technical term for this optical phenomenon, "aventurescence", is also derived from the same source.

Production
The original manufacturing process for goldstone was invented in seventeenth-century Venice by the Miotti family, which was granted an exclusive license by the Doge. Persistent folklore describes goldstone as an acccidental discovery by an unnamed Italian monastic order or medieval alchemists, but there is no pre-Miotti documentation to confirm this.
The most common form of goldstone is reddish-brown, containing tiny crystals of metallic copper that require special conditions to form properly. The initial batch is melted together from silica, copper oxide, and other metal oxides to chemically reduce the copper ions to elemental copper. The vat is then sealed off from the air and maintained within a narrow temperature range, keeping the glass hot enough to remain liquid while allowing metallic crystals to precipitate from solution without melting or oxidizing.
After a suitable crystallization period, the entire batch is cooled to a single solid mass, which is then broken out of the vat for selection and shaping. The final appearance of each batch is highly variable and heterogenous. The best material is near the center or "heart" of the mass, ideally with large, bright metal crystals suspended in a semitransparent glass matrix.

Variations

Copper colloid size and failure modes

Copper-based "red goldstone" aventurine glass exists on a structural continuum with transparent red copper ruby glass and opaque "sealing wax" purpurin glass, all of which are striking glasses whose reddish colors are created by colloidal copper. The key variable is controlling the colloid size: goldstone has macroscopic reflective crystals; purpurin glass has microscopic opaque particles; copper ruby glass has submicroscopic transparent nanoparticles.
The outer layers of a goldstone batch tend to have duller colors and a lower degree of glittery aventurescence. This can be caused by poorer crystallization, which simultanously decreases the size of reflective crystals and opacifies the surrounding glass with nonreflective particles. It can also be caused by partial oxidation of the copper, causing it to redissolve and form its usual transparent blue-green glass in ionic solution.
When reheated for lampworking and similar uses, the working conditions should control the temperature and oxidation as required for the original batch melt: keep the temperature below the melting point of copper (1084.62 °C) and use an oxygen-poor reducing flame, or risk decomposition into the failure modes described above.

Non-copper goldstones

Goldstone also exists in other color variants based on other elements. Cobalt or manganese can be substituted for copper; the resulting crystals have a more silvery appearance and are suspended in a strongly-colored matrix of the corresponding ionic color, resulting in blue goldstone or purple goldstone respectively.
Green goldstone, or chrome aventurine, forms its reflective particles from chromium oxides rather than the elemental metal, but is otherwise fairly similar.
The non-copper goldstones are easier to work with when reheated, due to the less stringent reduction requirements and higher melting points of manganese (1246 °C) and cobalt (1495 °C). Here's an example.

Look familiar?

Image
User avatar
Guest

Re: SANDSTONE PICS-update, it is thin glass-put a match to it

Post by Guest » August 22nd 2010, 7:32am

Brilliant find, that is the effin' schist that should promptly and preemptively dispel any claim by the Invictoads (you listening Skel/Rumple Minze/Lie-Long Lay-Low? Every watchlord knows you're reading this thread) that their so-called blue 'sandstone' is a material found anywhere outside the receiving end of a lavatory (oops I mean 'laboratory'). Just one more proof that the big yellow Iceturd has zero to do with horological alchemy (the merging of horological art and science) and everything to do with cynical marketing and mass production. Get a effin' clue watchgeeks!

SloMo wrote:
GEEKNOMO wrote:anybody can do an internet search on sandstone, blue sandstone, dark blue sandstone.................doesnt exist. not onn this planet, maybe Ilie has found an old rare deposit in his ass crack.


After not finding much on Blue Sandstone other than it is man made I looked at the other color of sandstone dial being offered as Gold Sandstone. IMO Blue and Gold sandstone are really Goldstone or aventurine glass (a lot more info when you search on goldstone). Just a sample of what I found on Wikipedia about goldstone.

GENUINE SANDSTONE MY ASS
Nomenclature

Another common name for the material is aventurine glass, based on the original Italian name avventurina (from avventura, "adventure" or "chance"). It is also sometimes called "stellaria" or "sun sitara" (sitara = "star" in Sanskrit) for its starry internal reflections, or "monk's gold" or "monkstone" from folkloric associations with an unnamed monastic order.
Curiously, aventurine glass is one of the few synthetic simulants to provide the eponym for the similar natural stones. The mineral name "aventurine" is used for forms of feldspar or quartz with mica inclusions that give a similar glittering appearance; the technical term for this optical phenomenon, "aventurescence", is also derived from the same source.

Production
The original manufacturing process for goldstone was invented in seventeenth-century Venice by the Miotti family, which was granted an exclusive license by the Doge. Persistent folklore describes goldstone as an acccidental discovery by an unnamed Italian monastic order or medieval alchemists, but there is no pre-Miotti documentation to confirm this.
The most common form of goldstone is reddish-brown, containing tiny crystals of metallic copper that require special conditions to form properly. The initial batch is melted together from silica, copper oxide, and other metal oxides to chemically reduce the copper ions to elemental copper. The vat is then sealed off from the air and maintained within a narrow temperature range, keeping the glass hot enough to remain liquid while allowing metallic crystals to precipitate from solution without melting or oxidizing.
After a suitable crystallization period, the entire batch is cooled to a single solid mass, which is then broken out of the vat for selection and shaping. The final appearance of each batch is highly variable and heterogenous. The best material is near the center or "heart" of the mass, ideally with large, bright metal crystals suspended in a semitransparent glass matrix.

Variations

Copper colloid size and failure modes

Copper-based "red goldstone" aventurine glass exists on a structural continuum with transparent red copper ruby glass and opaque "sealing wax" purpurin glass, all of which are striking glasses whose reddish colors are created by colloidal copper. The key variable is controlling the colloid size: goldstone has macroscopic reflective crystals; purpurin glass has microscopic opaque particles; copper ruby glass has submicroscopic transparent nanoparticles.
The outer layers of a goldstone batch tend to have duller colors and a lower degree of glittery aventurescence. This can be caused by poorer crystallization, which simultanously decreases the size of reflective crystals and opacifies the surrounding glass with nonreflective particles. It can also be caused by partial oxidation of the copper, causing it to redissolve and form its usual transparent blue-green glass in ionic solution.
When reheated for lampworking and similar uses, the working conditions should control the temperature and oxidation as required for the original batch melt: keep the temperature below the melting point of copper (1084.62 °C) and use an oxygen-poor reducing flame, or risk decomposition into the failure modes described above.

Non-copper goldstones

Goldstone also exists in other color variants based on other elements. Cobalt or manganese can be substituted for copper; the resulting crystals have a more silvery appearance and are suspended in a strongly-colored matrix of the corresponding ionic color, resulting in blue goldstone or purple goldstone respectively.
Green goldstone, or chrome aventurine, forms its reflective particles from chromium oxides rather than the elemental metal, but is otherwise fairly similar.
The non-copper goldstones are easier to work with when reheated, due to the less stringent reduction requirements and higher melting points of manganese (1246 °C) and cobalt (1495 °C). Here's an example.

Look familiar?

Image
Post Reply

Return to “Invicta controversies”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest