Château Picard

Wine, Beer, Weed and the hard stuff
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Château Picard

Post by koimaster » October 19th 2020, 8:51am

“Make it so!” -a phrase synonymous with Jean-Luc Picard, the thoughtful, cultured, bald starship captain role immortalised by English actor Sir Patrick Stewart for seven series on Paramount Television’s ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation’ and in a string of four feature films that ended in 2002.

Of his tenure in ‘The Next Generation’ Stewart has often described himself as being ‘extremely proud’ of his work and like many others of the cast regrets that Paramount ended the TV series when it did, in a drive to focus on big screen iterations for the Enterprise crew, which only achieved muted success.

Returning to his first love of taking on challenging dramatic roles on the live theatrical stage, where he achieved critical acclaim, it wasn’t too long before Stewart gained a lead role in another film franchise playing Professor Charles Xavier in ‘X-Men’.

Away from his demanding movie and theatre schedules, Sir Patrick Stewart served as Chancellor of Huddersfield University in West Yorkshire in the UK for 11 years. He was first appointed in 2004 and over his period of tenure was a regular visitor to the campus leading workshops with drama students, as well as being an overseas ambassador for the University. In 2016, the building used by the University’s Drama department, previously known as the ‘Milton Building’, was renamed the ‘Sir Patrick Stewart Building’.

Jumping forward to the present day, Stewart reprises the role when the ‘Star Trek: Picard’ series premiered on 23 January, initially on the US subscription streaming video on demand service CBS All Access.

Whereas ‘The Next Generation’ presented a humanist future in which issues like poverty, race and class have long been sorted out, and conflicts are more often resolved through negotiation and problem-solving than at the point of a phaser pistol, the new show is very different from its predecessor in virtually every respect — texture, tone, format and production values. Stewart is also genuinely uninterested in repeating himself in terms of characterisation.

Speaking about the new series he stated: “I think what we’re trying to say is important. The world of ‘Next Generation’ doesn’t exist anymore. It’s different. Nothing is really safe. Nothing is really secure.”

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Re: Château Picard

Post by biglove » October 19th 2020, 4:53pm

Never got into Next Gen or that other offshoot. Enjoyed the first few of the movies then lost interest.

Star Wars, on the other hand, continues to captivate and thrill.
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Re: Château Picard

Post by MKTheVintageBloke » October 19th 2020, 6:15pm

A friend of mine - an avid Trekkie, who got me into Star Trek - had a bottle of Chateau Picard recently. As per his take on it, it’s a decent wine. Dunno, haven’t tried.

Would like to try it one day. I am a Trekkie - not the sort that frequents conventions in a Starfleet uniform, though, and the height of me expressing the fact of being a Trekkie is wearing a Deep Space Nine ”Niners” T-shirt every now and then.
I have enjoyed most of the series, my favourites being TNG and DS9, closely followed by Enterprise, Voyager, and the original series from the 1960s (subsequent feature films included).

Not a fan of the Picard series. Feels somewhat forced, and I do wonder how did I manage to get through the first four episodes.

Above all, though, fuck Discovery, that fucking crock of fucking shite.
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Re: Château Picard

Post by bedlam » October 20th 2020, 9:08pm

MKTheVintageBloke wrote:
October 19th 2020, 6:15pm
A friend of mine - an avid Trekkie, who got me into Star Trek - had a bottle of Chateau Picard recently. As per his take on it, it’s a decent wine. Dunno, haven’t tried.

Would like to try it one day. I am a Trekkie - not the sort that frequents conventions in a Starfleet uniform, though, and the height of me expressing the fact of being a Trekkie is wearing a Deep Space Nine ”Niners” T-shirt every now and then.
I have enjoyed most of the series, my favourites being TNG and DS9, closely followed by Enterprise, Voyager, and the original series from the 1960s (subsequent feature films included).

Not a fan of the Picard series. Feels somewhat forced, and I do wonder how did I manage to get through the first four episodes.

Above all, though, fuck Discovery, that fucking crock of fucking shite.
I'm a science fiction fan first. Star Trek has been at it's best when it pushed new ideas and lots of TOS did this. Next Gen, DS9, Voyager & Co were space dramas based on the Trek universe. They really didn't push anything conceptually in the way TOS did.

The Picard series gets credit for showing the underside of the Federation and the real life limits of it's ideology, though it's exploration of big ideas was limited. And it has Jerry Ryan...nuff said.

Discovery is the first series since TOS that has pushed things conceptually. Conceptual leaps and new frontiers...science fiction is back in Trek. So I'm a fan.
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Re: Château Picard

Post by Falstaff » October 21st 2020, 10:00am

Captain Kirk could kick Picard's ass, sleep with his wife, beat him in a game of 3D chess, rescue an endangered Federation colony and thwart a Romulan invasion by the time Picard finished asking Counselor Troi if it was OK for him back the Enterprise into a parking space at Starbase 11.
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Re: Château Picard

Post by MKTheVintageBloke » October 21st 2020, 1:38pm

bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
I'm a science fiction fan first. Star Trek has been at it's best when it pushed new ideas and lots of TOS did this. Next Gen, DS9, Voyager & Co were space dramas based on the Trek universe. They really didn't push anything conceptually in the way TOS did.
TOS - and, as a consequence, the whole franchise - was something so radically new at its time, that anything that came later within the franchise is bound to be looked upon as nothing revolutionary.
bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
The Picard series gets credit for showing the underside of the Federation and the real life limits of it's ideology, though it's exploration of big ideas was limited. And it has Jerry Ryan...nuff said.
I liked the notion of breaking away from the "holier than thou" Federation concept. My beef with the Picard series is not the story that's bad, it's that the way it's told isn't good until some point. Feels erratic here, and painfully slow-paced there. Roughly about episode 5, gets better.
bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
Discovery is the first series since TOS that has pushed things conceptually. Conceptual leaps and new frontiers...science fiction is back in Trek. So I'm a fan.
Chick flick graphomaniacs doing a stint as Star Trek screenwriters for the sake of making a little crusade of their own - at the cost of the universal appeal of previous series - isn't really a conceptual leap, it's a sad signum temporis. It is also alienating the usual audience. Star Trek has been about universal values, and I'm not OK with anyone (read: Discovery's screenwriters) turning the franchise into their ideological playground, regardless of the ideology.
You cannot explain away a wantonly immoral act, because you think that it is connected to some higher purpose.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard, Star Trek: The Next Generation
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Re: Château Picard

Post by conjurer » October 21st 2020, 3:00pm

MKTheVintageBloke wrote:
October 21st 2020, 2:41pm
conjurer wrote:
October 21st 2020, 2:41pm
The fuck does "TOS" mean??
The Original Series.
Thanks!

A little joke:

Q: What do the starship Enterprise and a wad of toilet paper have in common when orbiting Uranus?

A: They're both searching for Klingons!
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Re: Château Picard

Post by koimaster » October 21st 2020, 3:09pm

MKTheVintageBloke wrote:
October 21st 2020, 1:38pm
bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
I'm a science fiction fan first. Star Trek has been at it's best when it pushed new ideas and lots of TOS did this. Next Gen, DS9, Voyager & Co were space dramas based on the Trek universe. They really didn't push anything conceptually in the way TOS did.
TOS - and, as a consequence, the whole franchise - was something so radically new at its time, that anything that came later within the franchise is bound to be looked upon as nothing revolutionary.

wow! Such loyalty to a 60's program what was all about one guy, William Shitner who has an ego larger then even that of a certain public figure. The only thing I can remember the original series doing that was cutting edge was the first inter-racial tv kiss. It was in fact supposed to be Spock but Shitner had a shit fit because it was all about HIM. There were in fact other series that were far more interesting. Dr. Who, Space Invaders, Time Tunnel, Lost in Space and even Fireball xl5 from the brits had more to offer IMHO.


bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
The Picard series gets credit for showing the underside of the Federation and the real life limits of it's ideology, though it's exploration of big ideas was limited. And it has Jerry Ryan...nuff said.
I liked the notion of breaking away from the "holier than thou" Federation concept. My beef with the Picard series is not the story that's bad, it's that the way it's told isn't good until some point. Feels erratic here, and painfully slow-paced there. Roughly about episode 5, gets better.

Agreed and I like the fact that the next gen crew is featured in roles that show growth such as 7 being more ruthless and the data of that era asking to be shut down
bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
Discovery is the first series since TOS that has pushed things conceptually. Conceptual leaps and new frontiers...science fiction is back in Trek. So I'm a fan.
Chick flick graphomaniacs doing a stint as Star Trek screenwriters for the sake of making a little crusade of their own - at the cost of the universal appeal of previous series - isn't really a conceptual leap, it's a sad signum temporis. It is also alienating the usual audience. Star Trek has been about universal values, and I'm not OK with anyone (read: Discovery's screenwriters) turning the franchise into their ideological playground, regardless of the ideology.
Discovery is before the federation became what it is today. Just as Enterprise was the beginning, the first steps of space travel, discovery is the next step, folding some of the figures from the original series into this new prequel. Looking forward to episode 2 tonight.


trivia:


In 1968, Gary Seven wore a Rolex GMT Master Pepsi. (TOS: "Assignment: Earth")[1]

Bernardo Calvera wore a wristwatch. (DS9: "Past Tense, Part I")

In 2254, a female crew member aboard the USS Enterprise was wearing a wristwatch while off duty. (TOS: "The Cage")

In the first scene from TOS: "Where No Man Has Gone Before", Kirk was scripted to be wearing a watch which he momentarily looked at. [2] However, no such watch appears in the final version of the scene. Kirk was again scripted to be wearing a wrist watch in the final draft script of TOS: "The Corbomite Maneuver" (dated 3 May 1966), in the episode's final scene. However, this reference to a watch wasn't included in the second revised final draft of the installment's teleplay (dated 20 May 1966) and is not shown on screen.
In a scene from the first draft script of TOS: "The Enemy Within", a duplicate of Kirk at one point looked at a wristwatch worn by Janice Rand. In a memo to John D.F. Black (dated 23 May 1966), Robert Justman pondered, "Does she wear a Timex or an Ingersol [sic]?"
The second draft script for TOS: "The Man Trap" (then called "Damsel with a Dulcimer") included a scene in which Kirk advised someone called "Jim" to check his own wristwatch. In a memo of script notes Robert Justman sent John D.F. Black (on 2 June 1966), Justman remarked that he didn't think the line was necessary. In another memo of script notes, this one from Gene Roddenberry to episode writer George Clayton Johnson (also sent on 2 June 1966), Roddenberry advised, "We're not playing our people as wearing watches. But we can if you check with Robert J., give him time to have something appropriate and futuristic made up."
In 2263 of the alternate reality, Ben wore a wristwatch. (Star Trek Beyond)

In 2265, Lee Kelso wore a wristwatch while on duty at the helm. (TOS: "Where No Man Has Gone Before")

In 2267, Korob wore a wristwatch. (TOS: "Catspaw")

In 2364, Doctor Beverly Crusher wore a wristwatch while reviving Yareena in a transporter room aboard the USS Enterprise-D. (TNG: "Code of Honor")

Vic Fontaine wore a wristwatch, as did Nog during the cracking of Frankie Eyes' safe. (DS9: "Badda-Bing, Badda-Bang")

https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Wristwatch
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Re: Château Picard

Post by conjurer » October 21st 2020, 3:30pm

koimaster wrote:
October 21st 2020, 3:09pm
MKTheVintageBloke wrote:
October 21st 2020, 1:38pm
bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
I'm a science fiction fan first. Star Trek has been at it's best when it pushed new ideas and lots of TOS did this. Next Gen, DS9, Voyager & Co were space dramas based on the Trek universe. They really didn't push anything conceptually in the way TOS did.
TOS - and, as a consequence, the whole franchise - was something so radically new at its time, that anything that came later within the franchise is bound to be looked upon as nothing revolutionary.

wow! Such loyalty to a 60's program what was all about one guy, William Shitner who has an ego larger then even that of a certain public figure. The only thing I can remember the original series doing that was cutting edge was the first inter-racial tv kiss. It was in fact supposed to be Spock but Shitner had a shit fit because it was all about HIM. There were in fact other series that were far more interesting. Dr. Who, Space Invaders, Time Tunnel, Lost in Space and even Fireball xl5 from the brits had more to offer IMHO.


bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
The Picard series gets credit for showing the underside of the Federation and the real life limits of it's ideology, though it's exploration of big ideas was limited. And it has Jerry Ryan...nuff said.
I liked the notion of breaking away from the "holier than thou" Federation concept. My beef with the Picard series is not the story that's bad, it's that the way it's told isn't good until some point. Feels erratic here, and painfully slow-paced there. Roughly about episode 5, gets better.

Agreed and I like the fact that the next gen crew is featured in roles that show growth such as 7 being more ruthless and the data of that era asking to be shut down
bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
Discovery is the first series since TOS that has pushed things conceptually. Conceptual leaps and new frontiers...science fiction is back in Trek. So I'm a fan.
Chick flick graphomaniacs doing a stint as Star Trek screenwriters for the sake of making a little crusade of their own - at the cost of the universal appeal of previous series - isn't really a conceptual leap, it's a sad signum temporis. It is also alienating the usual audience. Star Trek has been about universal values, and I'm not OK with anyone (read: Discovery's screenwriters) turning the franchise into their ideological playground, regardless of the ideology.
Discovery is before the federation became what it is today. Just as Enterprise was the beginning, the first steps of space travel, discovery is the next step, folding some of the figures from the original series into this new prequel. Looking forward to episode 2 tonight.


trivia:


In 1968, Gary Seven wore a Rolex GMT Master Pepsi. (TOS: "Assignment: Earth")[1]

Bernardo Calvera wore a wristwatch. (DS9: "Past Tense, Part I")

In 2254, a female crew member aboard the USS Enterprise was wearing a wristwatch while off duty. (TOS: "The Cage")

In the first scene from TOS: "Where No Man Has Gone Before", Kirk was scripted to be wearing a watch which he momentarily looked at. [2] However, no such watch appears in the final version of the scene. Kirk was again scripted to be wearing a wrist watch in the final draft script of TOS: "The Corbomite Maneuver" (dated 3 May 1966), in the episode's final scene. However, this reference to a watch wasn't included in the second revised final draft of the installment's teleplay (dated 20 May 1966) and is not shown on screen.
In a scene from the first draft script of TOS: "The Enemy Within", a duplicate of Kirk at one point looked at a wristwatch worn by Janice Rand. In a memo to John D.F. Black (dated 23 May 1966), Robert Justman pondered, "Does she wear a Timex or an Ingersol [sic]?"
The second draft script for TOS: "The Man Trap" (then called "Damsel with a Dulcimer") included a scene in which Kirk advised someone called "Jim" to check his own wristwatch. In a memo of script notes Robert Justman sent John D.F. Black (on 2 June 1966), Justman remarked that he didn't think the line was necessary. In another memo of script notes, this one from Gene Roddenberry to episode writer George Clayton Johnson (also sent on 2 June 1966), Roddenberry advised, "We're not playing our people as wearing watches. But we can if you check with Robert J., give him time to have something appropriate and futuristic made up."
In 2263 of the alternate reality, Ben wore a wristwatch. (Star Trek Beyond)

In 2265, Lee Kelso wore a wristwatch while on duty at the helm. (TOS: "Where No Man Has Gone Before")

In 2267, Korob wore a wristwatch. (TOS: "Catspaw")

In 2364, Doctor Beverly Crusher wore a wristwatch while reviving Yareena in a transporter room aboard the USS Enterprise-D. (TNG: "Code of Honor")

Vic Fontaine wore a wristwatch, as did Nog during the cracking of Frankie Eyes' safe. (DS9: "Badda-Bing, Badda-Bang")

https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Wristwatch
Christ, this is just what we need, some more fictional watch references for those unsatisfied with all the James Bond watch threads.
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Re: Château Picard

Post by bedlam » November 25th 2020, 10:18pm

MKTheVintageBloke wrote:
October 21st 2020, 1:38pm
bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
Discovery is the first series since TOS that has pushed things conceptually. Conceptual leaps and new frontiers...science fiction is back in Trek. So I'm a fan.
Chick flick graphomaniacs doing a stint as Star Trek screenwriters for the sake of making a little crusade of their own - at the cost of the universal appeal of previous series - isn't really a conceptual leap, it's a sad signum temporis. It is also alienating the usual audience. Star Trek has been about universal values, and I'm not OK with anyone (read: Discovery's screenwriters) turning the franchise into their ideological playground, regardless of the ideology.
I don't see it the same way.

There are still big ideas in play and Trek was always designed as an ideological playground. Roddenberry stated that outright.

In Disco they have developed entirely new modes of space travel, pushed gender role concepts further into gender fluidity,
annihilated all life then put it back, destroyed the Federation in order to see what its really made of...

These are huge existential quests, not just ideology.
Meritocracy: the privilege, wealth and advancement of those who chose their parents wisely.
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Re: Château Picard

Post by conjurer » November 26th 2020, 12:27am

bedlam wrote:
November 25th 2020, 10:18pm
MKTheVintageBloke wrote:
October 21st 2020, 1:38pm
bedlam wrote:
October 20th 2020, 9:08pm
Discovery is the first series since TOS that has pushed things conceptually. Conceptual leaps and new frontiers...science fiction is back in Trek. So I'm a fan.
Chick flick graphomaniacs doing a stint as Star Trek screenwriters for the sake of making a little crusade of their own - at the cost of the universal appeal of previous series - isn't really a conceptual leap, it's a sad signum temporis. It is also alienating the usual audience. Star Trek has been about universal values, and I'm not OK with anyone (read: Discovery's screenwriters) turning the franchise into their ideological playground, regardless of the ideology.
I don't see it the same way.

There are still big ideas in play and Trek was always designed as an ideological playground. Roddenberry stated that outright.

In Disco they have developed entirely new modes of space travel, pushed gender role concepts further into gender fluidity,
annihilated all life then put it back, destroyed the Federation in order to see what its really made of...

These are huge existential quests, not just ideology.
Gender fluidity? Capt. Kirk wouldn't have put his dick in that.
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Re: Château Picard

Post by bedlam » November 26th 2020, 2:14am

conjurer wrote:
November 26th 2020, 12:27am
Gender fluidity? Capt. Kirk wouldn't have put his dick in that.
The one thing that we can absolutely know in this world is, yeah, Kirk would have nailed it.
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