Domaine Naudin-Ferrand

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Domaine Naudin-Ferrand

Post by koimaster » February 28th 2020, 11:05am

Throughout Burgundy, Claire Naudin is considered to be one of best female winemakers and is deservedly known for the high quality wines originating from her vineyard Domaine Henri Naudin-Ferrand.

Like all great Burgundy wines, her wines generally make for easy drinking, demonstrating an intense fruitiness.

Situated in the village of Magny-lès-Villers, Domaine Henri Naudin-Ferrand can boast of an exceptional location, given that it is the only village of the Hautes-Côtes which straddles the boundary between the two appellations of Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes de Beaune and Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes de Nuits. The domaine covers some 22 hectares of vineyard (54.4 acres), of which some prestigious parcels are to be found in: Aloxe, Ladoix, Flagey Echezeaux, and Nuit St Georges.

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Re: Domaine Naudin-Ferrand

Post by Falstaff » February 28th 2020, 1:05pm

Good stuff - very nice Burgundies. I've enjoyed their wines more than once. I currently have a couple of bottles of the Naudin Ferrand Echezeaux Grand Cru 2012 and single bottle of the Nuits St. Georges Premier Cru Les Damodes 2013 in the cellar. I'll give 'em a few more years before I crack 'em open.

In Bordeaux, where Chateau ownership is usually a single entity, knowledge of the Chateau (and thus its terroir) is sufficient to make a judgement about the quality of the wine. Those chateaux who have established a historical reputation for continuing quality generally continue to produce the best wines. In Burgundy however, due to inheritance laws, vineyard ownership is split among many small owners - many of whom may own only a few rows of vines. For instance, in the famous Grand Cru Clos Vougeot vineyard in the Cote de Nuits, ownership is split among no fewer than 80 owners - each of whom may make their own wine. So it is not enough to know that a particular vineyard has historically produced superior wines, you have to be familiar with all the various producers to know who makes a quality wine and who doesn't.
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Re: Domaine Naudin-Ferrand

Post by MKTheVintageBloke » February 28th 2020, 3:38pm

Haven't ever gone for the posh labels among wines. The best stuff I had were choices made blindly in the Loire Valley, along the French Riviera, and in the lunch break on a stroll along the banks of the Rhone in Arles, a few klicks north of Camargue. If it's a good dry red or rose of the appelations of Cotes-du-Rhone and Cotes-du-Rhone-Villages, count me interested. Same goes for dry reds and whites from Touraine, which I have fond memories of. Not that I had one of the Touraine wines in a while.

This reminds me, I can't quite recall if my bottle of 2008 Amarone della Valpolicella, straight outta Italy, still gathers dust, or have I already committed it to my gullet.
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Re: Domaine Naudin-Ferrand

Post by Falstaff » February 28th 2020, 4:17pm

MKTheVintageBloke wrote:
February 28th 2020, 3:38pm
Haven't ever gone for the posh labels among wines. The best stuff I had were choices made blindly in the Loire Valley, along the French Riviera, and in the lunch break on a stroll along the banks of the Rhone in Arles, a few klicks north of Camargue. If it's a good dry red or rose of the appelations of Cotes-du-Rhone and Cotes-du-Rhone-Villages, count me interested. Same goes for dry reds and whites from Touraine, which I have fond memories of. Not that I had one of the Touraine wines in a while.

This reminds me, I can't quite recall if my bottle of 2008 Amarone della Valpolicella, straight outta Italy, still gathers dust, or have I already committed it to my gullet.

For me, I find that regardless of origin they never quite taste the same at home as they did in that little cafe or in the cellar of that vineyard. Ambiance counts. Rose? I'll take mine from Provence - usually a blend of cinsault and grenache.
"Open the pod bay doors, Hal." "I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that."
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